How to Properly Texas Rig

The Texas rig is arguably the most popular soft plastic rig used today. It can be used in freshwater as well as saltwater applications with many different kinds of soft plastics. I researched the inventor of the Texas Rig and finding a consensus is difficult. About the only thing we know for sure is that it was invented in Texas. Some say it was a guide down there that came up with the idea although his name was not saved for posterity. It’s too bad because that person would have definitely gone down in history as a fishing legend.

Being weedless, the Texas rig allows you to fish a soft plastic bait in and around weeds, brush and other types of cover while being able to stay virtually free of getting hung up. While it was first used primarily with worms it is now used with countless soft plastic baits in many different applications. You can fish a worm slowly along the bottom. You can pitch and flip a creature bait around cover, or burn a soft swimbait like a Gambler EZ through the Kissimmee grass in lakes in Florida. In saltwater, you can use the Texas Rig to fish a fluke or artificial shrimp. It is truly one of the most versatile rigs you can throw and even though it is decades old, there are still many anglers that don’t know how to rig it correctly.  In this video, we show you how to properly Texas rig a worm but remember that you can use this same rig with different baits. Give it a try the next time you are hitting the lake or skinny waters of the Gulf of Mexico and let us know how it fares for you. If you’re interested in purchasing the Trapper Tackle hooks mentioned in this video, click here.

By: Founder of Freshwaternation.com and Live to Fish Team Member: Dan Doyle

Recover & Recycle Monofilament with Live toFish

Live to Fish has teamed up with the Florida Wildlife Commission to recover and recycle monofilament fishing line. Monofilament line can last hundreds of years before breaking down. Improperly discarded monofilament line causes devastating problems for marine life and the environment in general. Marine mammals, sea turtles, fish, and birds can become injured from entanglements, and some marine life go as far as to ingest the line, often dying as a result. Human divers and swimmers are also at risk.

The Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program (MRRP) is a statewide effort that encourages monofilament recycling through a network of drop-off locations. This network of drop off locations is an efficient way to move large volumes of unwanted monofilament line, it’s free and available to the public at multiple locations including Live to Fish’s retail store in Hudson, Florida.

Please take the extra time to discard your monofilament line, it’s easy and it can make a huge difference in preserving our marine environments for generations to come. Live to Fish will gladly accept your unwanted fishing line and ensure that it gets disposed of properly. In the event that you are unable to find a drop-off location near you, feel free to mail your unwanted fishing line to us. Our store location, hours of operation, and mailing address are listed here.

Fuel Saving Tips When Using Your Boat

No one wants a trip out on the water to be something that results in a significant dent in your wallet.  Although some electric battery powered outboard options exist, they’re far from popular.  Nearly everyone’s outboard engine runs on gasoline with some boaters using diesel engines.  Unless your engine is one of the very few that runs on a battery, using your boat inevitably involves purchasing fuel.  “How much fuel will it burn?” is one of the most frequently asked questions by boaters looking to purchase a new outboard, or a new boat and outboard engine combination together.  The answer to that question is not as simple as providing an answer for fuel consumption in a car.  You may not realize that the amount of fuel your boat consumes is largely determined by factors you have control over.  The manner in which you run your boat; either all out, wide open throttle (WOT), or at a lesser speed, allowing for a more efficient correlation between RPMs and fuel consumption, will make a difference.  The way you load your boat and how much weight you add to your boat are additional major factors.  More than a half-dozen user controlled contributing factors need to be considered when calculating your boat’s fuel consumption.  Most people can easily figure out their car’s fuel consumption by dividing the distance traveled by the number of gallons used.  Calculating the fuel efficient of your boat involves different factors and a different formula.  Ultimately, fuel economy is improved by a combination of tactics that incrementally result in your boat using less fuel.  Below, we’ve listed a few tips to help you save fuel when out on the water.

Heading offshore 1

Choose the Right Prop

Selecting the right boat propeller is an important factor in maximizing your boat’s performance. Determining the correct size and style of boat prop will keep the engine operating within its recommended rpm range and allow it to apply its maximum horsepower to the water.  You need to be sure you’re selecting the right size propeller.  The size of a boat propeller is determined by referring to both diameter and pitch.  Diameter is twice the distance from the center hub of the propeller to the tip of any blade.  Generally smaller diameter props correspond with smaller, lower horse power engines.  Correspondingly, larger diameter props correspond with larger boats. Pitch is the forward movement of a boat propeller through one complete revolution measured in inches. Lowering prop pitch will increase acceleration and pulling power. A higher pitch prop will make a boat go faster; provided the outboard engine has enough power to keep the rpms in the optimum range. If your boat’s outboard engine doesn’t produce enough power to run a higher pitch prop, your overall performance will suffer.  Moreover, you can cause expensive and sometimes irrevocable engine damage.  Many factors come into play when selecting a propeller.  So numerous are the factors that propeller selection alone is the proper subject of an entirely different article.  There are differences in propellers such a rake, skew, and cup.  Ultimately, the message we here at Live to Fish want to convey is that there is a significant degree of importance associated with choosing the right propeller.  The correct propeller helps ensure maximum engine life and minimize wasted fuel consumption.

Optimum Trim

Utilizing trim tabs and properly using the tilt and trim on your outboard engine, will allow you to reduce the drag created by your boat’s hull as it moves through the water.  Reducing drag allows you to save fuel.  You will never be able to optimize your boat’s fuel efficiency if you don’t optimize your boat’s trim.  A properly trimmed boat has only the minimal amount of hull running through the water.  How do you know if you’ve got the minimum amount of your hull in the water?  Keep trimming out until your propeller begins to cavitate.  Cavitation occurs when the formation of air vapor is drawn into the water your boat is running through by the propeller.  You’ll know it’s occurring when the sound of your engine running changes dramatically.

Hard tops, T-Tops, and Towers

Opening or closing windshields, and raising or lowering canvas enclosures can help improve fuel efficiency.  Canvas enclosed T-tops, hardtops, towers and Bimini tops all create aerodynamic drag, causing the engine to work harder to make the boat go at any given speed.  On certain boats,  having canvas enclosures up can lower a boat’s top end speed by as much as 3 to 5 mph.  It’s important to note that not all T-Tops are the same.  There are some T-Tops that actually increase fuel efficiency by acting as a wing and creating lift.  A t-top’s ability to create lift is highly debated.  Boat manufacturers and t-top manufacturers will swear that their design creates lift and reduces drag.  Lift is produced when the air traveling over the top of a surface produces less pressure than the air traveling beneath the surface.  The problem with claims concerning a t-top’s ability to create lift is that water is close to 1,000 times more dense than air.  Because water is involved in determining lift given the substance your boat’s hull is running in, actual lift would normally not be something your boat would be capable of experiencing; regardless of the design of your t-top.  Another problem with these claims is the speed that air planes travel at versus the speeds most boaters travel at.  Lift could be a factor when the boat is traveling at 70 to 80 mph.  How often you travel at such speeds would be specific to you and your boat design.  The best course of action is to use your boat with any enclosures open to allow for the passage of air.  You can experiment by next closing certain enclosures and determining how much an impact on your fuel efficiency closing that enclosure has.

Back Off, Burn Less

Unless you’re competing in a fishing tournament, trying to make it over an area known to be shallow before the tide drops too much, or simply pushing the throttle to it’s limits in an effort to satisfy that need for speed that lives in most of us, slow down.  You’ll experience significant fuel savings without costing you any real time.

Put Your Boat on a Strict Diet

One of the quickest ways to get more miles per gallon is to reduce the weight you’re carrying.  What’s true for your car is true for your boat.  Most boaters are guilty of carrying too much gear.  A majority of the accumulation of the extra gear occurs slowly throughout the time you own your boat.  One tackle box, one water ski, and perhaps one additional gadget at a time. One of the quickest ways to get more miles per gallon is to remove items you don’t need.  We’re not suggesting that you remove tools, spare parts, or other safety items.  However, you don’t need all the fishing gear if you’re not going to be fishing.  You don’t need water skis or a wake board stowed below if you’re not going to be doing any of either.  If you store twelve packs or more of other types of drinks, just in case, removing those cases before you leave the dock will result in you saving more fuel.

Clean, Smooth, Hull

aboutus

Karl Sandstrom, a 21-year veteran with Evinrude, explained, “a clean, smooth bottom is a real efficiency enhancer.” If you keep your boat at a slip or mooring, use a quality bottom paint.  Traditional hard bottom paints are effective at reducing fouling on your hull, but hard bottom paints create a cratered surface after a few years of built-up coats. If you notice such craters on the bottom of your boat, use a scraper, hire a diver to clean the bottom, or have your bottom cleaned with a bead blaster to remove old cratered paint.  Joel Macri, captain of the Pershing Motor Yacht Milagros explained, “we have our bottom cleaned once every month with a diver.”  Once a month may sound extreme, but so is the vessel Captain Macri is piloting.   The Milagros boats twin MTU diesel’s turning out 2,638 HP each, for a total of 5,275 HP, turning twin propellers that are 4.5″ feet each in diameter.Photo of the Pershing Propellers

Maximizing efficiency as to your boat’s hull can be achieved through selecting what are called ablative paints.  Ablative paints are also known as self – polishing bottom paints.  It is a softer paint and allows the coating to wear off at a controlled rate.  A good comparison would be to imagine a bar of soap.  The wearing away of the self-polishing bottom paint allows for new, un-oxidized paint to be exposed. If you normally keep your boat on a trailer, or it comes in and out of the water for any reason, the paint will oxidize within 72 hours. Once placed back in service, the oxidized ablative paint wears away and exposes a new fresh outer coating with active protection. Ablative bottom paint is engineered with more recent and advanced technology than the traditional hard bottom, bottom paints.  It is the preferred bottom paint of most users since it typically lasts longer and continuously exposes a new active outer coating that protects against marine growth.

Calculate Your Boat’s Fuel Consumption:

A formula you’re probably familiar with for calculating how much gas your car uses is one in which you divide the total miles traveled by the total gallons of fuel used.  Once you have the total number of miles, you divide that by gallons to get what is called your average fuel consumption.  For boating, there is a different formula for calculating how much fuel you’re burning.  A different formula is necessary because the conditions a boat must encounter and travel over are different than what a car’s engine has to deal with.  Sea conditions vary more widely than road conditions.  The time it takes to cover a distance with a boat as opposed to car varies more often due to the significance of other factors not found on the road.  As a result, your boat’s fuel consumption is measured in gallons per hour (GPH). You measure fuel efficiency in pounds of fuel used per horsepower developed per hour. Boating lingo associated with fuel consumption will sometimes refer to the fuel consumption calculation as the, “brake – specific fuel consumption.”  In calculating fuel consumption for your boat, it’s important to know that gasoline weighs about 6.1 pounds per gallon and diesel fuel weighs about 7.2 pounds per gallon.  Generally, gasoline engines burn about 0.5 pounds of fuel per hour per horsepower unit.  On average, an in-tune four-stroke gasoline engine will burn about 0.50 pounds of fuel per hour for each unit of horsepower.  A well-maintained diesel engine burns about 0.40 pounds of diesel fuel per hour for each unit of horsepower it produces. These figures don’t take drag of the boat, sea conditions, or efficiency losses through transmissions and bearings into account. However, these figures do provide an excellent relative difference between engines.

Formula To Estimate Maximum Engine Fuel Consumption

GPH = (specific fuel consumption x HP) divided by Fuel Specific Weight

Constants in the formula are the Weight of a Gallon of Gas vs. a Gallon of Diesel

Specific Fuel Consumption:

Gasoline Engine: .50 lb. per HP.

Diesel Engine .40 lb. per HP

Fuel Specific Weight:  Gasoline: 6.1 lb. per gal. Diesel: 7.2 lb per gal.

300-hp Diesel Engine Example:  GPH = (0.4 x 300)/ 7.2 = 120/7.2 = 16.6 GPH

300-hp Gasoline Engine Example: GPH = (0.50 x 300)/ 6.1 = 150/6.1 = 24.5 GPH

Keep in mind that these formulas apply when the engine is making peak horsepower, which usually is near wide-open throttle. Fuel consumption will be decreased at cruising speeds.

Another way is to take the total engine horsepower and divide it by 10 for gas engines or .06 for diesel engines. That formula is simpler to calculate and easier to remember. You don’t even need a pencil and paper. However, it’s not going to be as accurate as the formulas above. The result represents the approximate gallons per hour the engine will burn at wide-open throttle. For example, a 150-horse engine will use about 15 gallons per hour. However, that figure is an average.  It can vary by as much as 10 to 20 percent.

There are marine electronics that can help in determining your boat’s fuel efficiency available from our website, www.livetofish.com One that is used for measuring your boat’s fuel efficiency is the Lowrance Fuel Flow sensor.  If you don’t see something you’d like or need on our website, feel free to contact us at 1-844-934-7446, email at: contactus@livetofish.com or visit our showroom: Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, FL 34669Building Front

Effectively Fish Far and Wide

Inevitably, every fishing trip ends.  What happens in between separates the good trips from the bad.  The memorable moments from the mundane.  One of our goals at Live to Fish is to ensure your fishing experiences that would otherwise be ordinary or dull are a thing of the past.  We’re happy to share our knowledge and resources.  With the benefit of our expertise, you stand a much better chance of creating some of the best  fishing memories you’ll have.  Though we can’t improve relations with your in – laws, we can help ensure you end up with more fish on the end of your line.

 

Common knowledge provides that our planet is mostly covered in water.  For fishing purposes, that means you’ve got a lot of ground… er, I mean water to cover.  For most of us, fishing trips don’t happen every day.  When they do, the duration is limited.  In order to make the most of that limited time, some suggestions are provided for you to consider.

Backwater estuary 2015Your fishing trip plan (float plan) should involve hitting several very specific spots.  Sure, you can just drift a flat and see what hits.  You can also enter an airport and buy a ticket to a location based on nothing other than how soon the next plane is taking off.  The point is, most people invest some degree of pre-planning.  If one of  your proposed spots is particularly expansive, you’re going to want to find out if fish are there as quickly as possible.  Yes, fishing is about relaxing, slowing down, and simply spending time on the water.  An article about finding fish quickly seems inconsistent with establishing the leisurely pace most associate with fishing.   A pace some believe should be the rule, rather than the exception, when on the water.   At Live to Fish, we understand and encourage adopting a laid-back attitude on the water.  We recognize the importance of reconnecting with friends and family.

Backwater creek 2015

Now, with that issue put to rest, who said, “reconnecting,” or, “leisure time,” doesn’t involve putting as many fish in the boat as possible?  No one!  Certainly no one at Live to Fish.  We’re out on the water for comradery.  We’re out there for the opportunity to teach a young son, daughter, or grandchild the benefits of fishing.  In case you’re wondering, as a matter of fact, yes… we have been aboard when the fishing slows down, and inevitably heard someone make the hackneyed, thoughtless remark, “that’s why they call it fishing and not catching.”  Ugh….That’s a pet peeve around here.  Call it what you want.  We leave the dock to catch.

So, the question becomes: what’s the fastest way to explore a large body of water to confirm the presence of fish?

If you’re offshore, high speed trolling is one option.  High speed trolling would be dragging your baits while your boat is going between 14 and 20 knots.  Such speeds result in covering more distance than proceeding at traditional trolling speeds.  Keep in mind that those high speeds are only going to attract certain predators.  Specifically, those predatory game fish willing and capable of attacking a bait moving that fast.  One such predatory gamefish is a wahoo.  Wahoo swim at speeds that exceed 60 mph.  So, trolling at 14, 16 and even 20 knots has become commonplace through using techniques developed by Capt. Ron Schatman, winner of a dozen major Bahamas wahoo tournaments over five years.  High speed trolling is not only limited to targeting certain species, it’s also a method of fishing limited by weather conditions.  No one aboard will be too thrilled about proceeding at 18 knots in windy weather and a sea state consisting of a 6’ foot chop.

If you’re inshore, consider using search baits.  A search bait refers to a type of lure you can work quickly and effectively over a large body of water.  Three of the most effective are: crankbaits, spinnerbaits, and topwater lures.  Certain jerk baits also fall into the search bait category.  When prospecting with search baits, you’ve got a good chance of getting the fish to show themselves.  Once you’ve nailed down a location, you can switch to more finesse style baits. deep-diver-crankbait

To help you paint a mental picture, imagine the following scenario:   You’ve just motored behind a mangrove wall.  This living wall of mangroves is high, thick, and about a half mile long.  A thing of beauty in and of itself, behind the wall exists a superb grass flat.  The mangroves do an excellent job of hiding this gem of a fishing spot.  You found it by accident one day about two years ago.  Since then, you’ve disclosed it to no more than one other fishing buddy.  Though you can’t imagine being the only one that knows about this spot; thus far you’ve never seen another boat here during any of your visits.

You’re careful with your approach.  At just over 100 yards away, you cut your engine.  You cover the remaining distance with your trolling motor.  You don’t dare run your trolling motor at a speed above a 2 or 3.  Particularly wary redfish will spook from the sound of trolling motor being run at high speed.  Perched on the bow with your rod in one hand, you’re panning from left to right; thanking god some optometrist figured out that polarized lenses in sunglasses would benefit fisherman.

It’s been a beautiful morning.  The seas are flat clam.  The run from the dock to this spot was like crossing glass.   The tide has been coming in for the past few hours.  High tide is only about a half hour away.  From experience, you know this spot is most productive right when the tide changes.  There’s something deeply satisfying about knowing you’re in the right place at the right time.  That sensation is what you’re experiencing now.

When the tide shFlatsifts to outgoing, baitfish are flushed from the estuaries that surround this flat.  Snook and Trout await these baitfish.  You watch the ever-changing imagery beneath your boat slowly pass by.   It’s mesmerizing.  The water is crystal clear.  Kind of like floating on air; and only about 4 feet deep.  Rich, thick turtle grass covers the bottom with intermittent patches of white sand.  A small sea turtle just swam off and away from your boat.

Just like a golfer doesn’t play a round of golf with just one club, you don’t go out on the water with just one rod.  Your favorite rod and reel combos are aboard.  Rigged up and ready in your rod holders.

Your mind begins to drift… You want one of those Minn Kota® iPilot trolling motors; or at least one you can steer with a remote control that hangs around your neck.  Barely audible, a sigh escapes as you think about the latest saltwater fishing technology. . . Then you snap out of that ungrateful reverie.  Fortunately, you’re quick to realize you have more to be grateful for than you’re acknowledging.  You laugh to yourself, knowing you’ll never believe you have enough fishing gear.  You continue your approach while remaining as stealthy as possible.

You’re not certain where the fish are.  You just know they’re in the general vicinity.  You unhook your lure from the hook keeper.  It hangs free at the end of the leader, slowly swinging back and forth about two to three feet from your rod tip.  Yep.  You’re ready to start making casts.

The scenario described above is one in which use of a search bait would be beneficial.  Whether you’re making casts from the bow of your boat, or casting from land, the best way to work a lure while using it as a search bait is to, “fan cast,” the area.  This simply means to cast from one side to the other, throwing your lure in a spot slightly farther away from the last place you threw it out each time.   Once you reach the other side, you move and fan cast another area.  When you’re where fish the fish are, using this method will result in your lure meeting up with one of their mouths soon enough.

At Live to Fish, we’re passionate about much more than just the sport of fishing.  We admit to being obsessive over how our business is run.  We want to ensure that each and every customer finds dealing with us to be easy, enjoyable, and productive.  If our showroom in Hudson, Florida is too far, check out our website at www.livetofish.com   You can contact us through the website.  We’ll gladly answer any questions you have.  Should you want an item you don’t see on our webpage, LET US KNOW!  We take pride in being able to find the products our customers want at competitive prices.  Although we can’t guarantee we’ll find anything you may ask, we can guarantee that if anyone can find your product, it’s us.  What do you have to lose?  Looking forward to hearing from you – Live to Fish

Stilt House Photo

Don’t Leave the Dock Without Reading This First

If you asked people today whether they have enough free time, polls taken show that most individuals don’t believe there’s enough free time.  Time poverty is an issue often discussed among economists.  The concern that raises for us at Live to Fish is to help you maximize your time on the water.  We know the chances are that your fishing trip was planned well in advance.  We believe you’ve worked hard and earned it!  We sympathize with the fact that you look forward to your time on the water because, well, simply put, so do we.

Thoughts of the sun on your skin, the smell of the water, casting your favorite rod and reel, catching what bites, and otherwise relaxing on the part of our world that makes up the majority of our plant, helped drown out the otherwise unpleasant experiences you endured on land.  You’d keep telling yourself, “it will all be worth in it when I’m fishing… when I’m finally out there…”  As the date of the excursion came closer, a portion of each evening was spent in preparation.  Even if your trip was a total last-minute event that came about, the information below will help.

Return from Gulf

One of the worst feelings anyone can have is to be hours into your fishing trip and realize you left an essential piece of gear at home.  Perhaps one of your marine electronics or one of your boat’s components fails.  Leaving you to berate yourself for failing to do the preliminary maintenance work necessary to help ensure your time on the water is as hassle free as possible.

You have to have a line in the water to catch a fish.  Time spent tending to other matters is time lost in which you could have otherwise hooked up.  We’re here to help you increase the time your line spends in the water, ensure have everything you need, and make the most of the valuable time you’ve been looking forward to.  Let the trip be a source of rejuvenation and revitalizing for you.   Reading the suggestions below will ensure you stay on track in that regard.

Lures:

Rapala Shadow Rap Shad 09 Crank Bait
One of the many artificial lures available both on our website, http://www.livetofish.com and in our showroom. This crankbait from Rapala is effective on both freshwater and saltwater fish

Check through your crankbaits, topwater lures, jigs, and other swimbaits.  Make sure all hooks and split rings are in good condition; especially lures with treble hooks.  Replace any components that need replacing.  Check your tackle storage solutions.  Many anglers take advantage of the water tight tackle storage boxes. However, over time, the rubber ring that provides protection from water intrusion can wear out; or come out of alignment with the lid.  Make sure this rubber ring is in good condition.  If your lures have become tangled during storage, now would be good time to untangle them and store them separately in tackle trays.  One of the most frustrating circumstances to deal with is when you see activity on the water, locate your stowaway tray that contains the lure you need, only to open the tackle storage container and find the lure tangled up with three or four others.  There’s a saying – “luck is a matter of preparation meeting opportunity.”  Do the preparation necessary to maximize on the opportunity.

Rods:

G Loomis Pro Green Fishing Rods
We offer a wide variety of rods by many manufacturers. Some of which include, G Loomis, St. Croix, Redbone, Shimano, Crowder, Star Rods, and 13 Fishing
St. Croix .jpg
2017 St. Croix Avid Inshore

Take each of your rods out and inspect them separately.  Are all your guides secure?  Look at the inner ring of each guide.  See the photo below to be clear on what I’m referring to when I mention, “inner ring.”

 

Spinning GuideThe inner ring in the photo is the gray colored area inside the round shiny metal circular outer portion of the guide.  Use your finger to feel around the inside of each guide ring.  For the guides that are too small to fit a finger through, you can take a cue tip and run it through the guide.  What you’re looking for are any knicks. If you feel a knick, or see a crack, replace that guide before fishing.  Replacing the entire guide is actually easier than trying to snap in a new ring.  Besides, good luck finding just the inner ring in exactly the correct diameter.  If you’re running a cue tip through the guide and some of the cotton catches, then you’ve got a crack or knick in that ring too.  Again, the entire guide should be replaced.  Fortunately, we offer rod repair services at Live to Fish with a quick turnaround time.  Our address is:  Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, Fl 34669.  The reason for replacement is that the inner part of your fishing rod guide is the area your line moves through.  Your line is your essential, and only, connection to your catch.  When you’re fighting a fish, a knick, crack, or other imperfection, can result in your line being aggressively worn, cut, and breaking.  Many otherwise unexplainable break offs have occurred as a result of a damaged guide ring.  Is the reel seat on your rod secure?  When you secure your reel to your rod, you should be able to tighten down the reel seat until you feel confident that your reel is securely affixed to your rod.  You don’t want to have flex either way, in any direction.  A loose, broken, or otherwise compromised reel seat, is not something you want to discover when you’re fighting a fish you’ve spent time and energy chasing after.

Reels:

Shimano Stradic and Shimano Stradic Ci4+
We offer a wide range of spinning, casting, and conventional type reels from top manufacturers.
sustain .jpg
The new 2017 Shimano Sustain Spinning Reels, winner at ICAST 2017

Entire articles have been written on reel maintenance.  We’re not going that in depth here.  If there are new noises coming from your reel when you turn the handle, you’ve got a problem.  If it’s harder to turn the handle without any load on the line than it has been, again, you’ve got a problem.  If you feel a wobble when reeling in, you’ve got a problem.  These scenarios apply to both baitcasting and spinning reels.  Your issue may be one that is very simply to fix.  It could simply be that your reel is in need of lubrication.  Make a habit of keeping your reels in good working order on a regular basis and you never have to worry about an unwanted surprise at the wrong time.   One of the easiest and most beneficial things you can do after every trip is to thoroughly wash your rods and reels down with fresh water.  Do not spray your reel with water at high pressure.  Even with all the seals of modern reels, you don’t want to be the reason for water intrusion in your reel in an area that should remain dry.  Another simple, yet very helpful practice, is to spray your reels down with Ardent Reel Kleen after you’ve washed them down with fresh water.

Fishing Line:

When was the last time you changed your line?  Changing line was more common when everyone used monofilament because braid hadn’t been invented.  With the introduction of braided fishing line, people are more reluctant to change their line than in the past.  There’s increased cost, some people don’t know how to add monofilament backing first, and there’s the knowledge that braid is stronger.  Fortunately, Live to Fish will spool your reel with new braid at a cost per yard that we’ve set as the lowest in the area.  You simply drop off your reel at Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, FL 34669 www.livetofish.com with instructions on what line you would like.  Often times, your reel can be re-spooled while you wait.  People have lost huge fish and expensive rigs simply because they failed to change their line.  Continuing to use your line beyond a period of time that’s safe will greatly increase the risk of a break off.  Offshore trolling lures can be quite costly.  It’s not impossible to lose a lure that’s worth more than what new line would cost.  There are a number of factors to consider when determining how often you should change your braided line: The lower the pound test braid, the more susceptible your line is to wear and tear, and the more often you should change it.  If you frequently fish in areas that have heavy amounts of floating seagrass with small barnacles, those barnacles rub up against your line when fishing a fish.  It’s not such a concern with 50lb or 60lb test braid, but it can be a concern with 10 or 15 lb test braid.  It may sound as if your line contacting floating seaweed when fighting a fish would be something you could safely ignore.  We sell a wide range of braided lines in various pound test strengths.  However, if you’re fishing a low pound test braid, when your line comes in contact with seaweed upon which small barnacles have grown, it’s like moving you line across a very fine cheese grater or sand paper.  If you’re doing a lot of fishing around rocks and oysters, keep an eye out for any parts of your line appearing worn.  If it’s been 6 to 12 months, and you fish fairly often, make a habit of changing your line.  The easiest way to do this is to set a simple calendar reminder at 6 to 8 month intervals.

Polarized Glasses:

I’m sure you’ve heard of the benefits polarized glasses provide when out on the water.  Polarized lenses are perfect for boating, fishing, surfing or any time spent on the water.   By cutting down on the glare, you’ll be able to see fish you wouldn’t normally be able to see at all.  Just keep in mind, when you can see the fish, they can see you.  There are a number of manufacturers that churn out some high quality polarized sunglasses.  One of the most popular for fishermen are those made by Costa Del Mar.  Costa developed the 580 lens.  The technology involved in the manufacturing of this lens, particularly the 580G, greatly enhances your time on the water.  You’ll feel less eye strain and see more fish.  At Live to Fish, we offer a wide range of Costa Del Mar frames and lenses.

Costa Del Mar Sunglasses
Live to Fish sells a wide variety of Costa Del Mar Sunglasses. Seen in the photo is one of two display cases located in our showroom.

Checklist of things is available from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission.

Alternate propulsion (i.e. paddle or oar)

Anchors & Line

Batteries (fully charged and encased in plastic boxes)

Bilge device (bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device)

Boat lights

Bright flashlight or searchlight

Boat & trailer registration, permits, licenses

Bug repellant

Clothing

Compass

Drinking water (1 gallon per person, per day)

Fire extinguisher (right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible)

First aid kit i.e. Band-Aids, first-aid Cream, Campo-Phenique (good for minor burns, cuts and scrapes), Tums, lip balm.

Food

Fuel

Kill switch (check with motor started)

Map/Charts (in waterproof container)

Matches/fire starter (in waterproof container)

Navigation lights & spare bulbs

Boat plug

Pocket knife

Sound producing device (i.e. whistle, horn)

Spare trailer tire (check condition)

Toilet paper

Trailer lights (and brakes if applicable)

Sunglasses

Sunscreen

Spare prop and lock-nut or shear pin

Weather radio

Tools

Visual distress signals (check current dates on flares, proper number)

Watch or clock

Night before list-

Hook up trailer and check lights and brakes (if applicable)

Charge batteries

Check fuel

Check boat lights

Turn on batteries, “check 1, 2, all switch” make sure it is functioning

Turn on and check all electronics

Check boat plug

Secure straps and tie down

Copyright 2017, Live to Fish, All Rights Reserved.