Lew’s Mach Crush Baitcaster from Live to Fish

Mach Crush 2
Lew’s Mach Crush Baitcasting Reel

Lew’s Mach Crush baitcast reels are available from Live to Fish.  You can find them in our brand new showroom and on our website, www.livetofish.com  Whether you’re looking for a right or left handed version of the Lew’s Mach Crush Speed Spool SLP Baitcasting Reel, our price remains a competitive $159.95.   A great deal for a great reel made by one of the top manufacturers in the industry.  The Mach Crush features Lew’s proprietary SLP Super Low Profile compact Speed Spool design, housed in a durable graphite frame with graphite sideplates.  The use of composite materials contributes to the reel’s low 7.3 oz. weight.  Whenever I hear that a reel is, “competitively priced,” or has, “good value,” personally, I get suspicious.  I become suspicious of the reel’s true inherent quality.  It’s just my opinion, but I’d rather pay more for quality fishing gear, take care of it, and know I can rely on it.  I like knowing it will hold it’s value as well as it’s own when a fish is on the line.  There are few reels that don’t break the bank but still offer the quality found in the Lew’s Mach Crush.  I would certainly be the first to point out any such flaws if the truth were otherwise.  The Lew’s Mach Crush performs just as well, if not better, than reels costing over $100.00 more.  The impressive performance comes from a premium 10-bearing system composed of double-shielded stainless-steel bearings.  The significance of the bearings being double shielded lies in the corrosion resistance and overall reel longevity.   Another factor contributing the reel’s capabilities is what Lew’s refers to as their “ZeroReverse,” anti-reverse.  A reel can look great on the outside, but contain substandard components inside.  Fortunately, that’s not the case with Lew’s Mach Crush.  If Lew’s made reels with sub par internal gears, they would never have been around as long as they have.  The main gear and crankshaft are strong solid brass. The 95mm bowed aluminum handle features another unique Lew’s invention: Winn Dri-Tac knobs.  These knobs ensure a no-slip grip in all conditions. Finally, the reel’s drag is Lew’s proven 20-pound rugged carbon drag system.

  • Strong and lightweight, Super Low Profile (SLP) graphite frame and sideplates
  • Machined and double anodized aluminum U-shape 32mm spool
  • High strength solid brass main gear and crank shaft
  • Premium 10-bearing system with double-shielded stainless-steel ball bearings and Zero Reverse® one-way clutch bearing
  • Externally-adjustable Multi-Setting Brake (MSB) dual cast control system utilizing both an external click-dial for setting the magnetic brake, plus 4 individually disengageable disk-mounted internal brake shoes that operate on centrifugal force
  • Double-anodized aluminum spool tension adjustment with audible click
  • Rugged carbon fiber drag system, provides up to 20 lbs. drag power
  • Anodized bowed aluminum 95mm handle with oversized Winn® Dri-Tac handle knobs
  • Anodized aluminum bowed drag star with audible click adjustment
  • Quick release sideplate lock lever
  • Zirconia line guide
  • External lube port

 HISTORY OF THE LEW’S COMPANY:

Lew Childre was said to be a man ahead of time.  Affable and outgoing, Lew easily made friends.  He had a way of expressing himself that compelled people to listen.  His passion for fishing flourished on the Gulf Coast of Alabama.  Lew married Vivian; who went by the nickname, “Bebe.”  Life wasn’t easy for Lew and his family, as they encountered numerous trials and tribulations during their early years of marriage.  Their difficulties were not lessened by the fact that they were working to raise two young sons named Craig and Casey. Lew first attempted to start a business selling shrimp as bait to fishermen.  That evolved into what became a small tackle shop.  Lew’s interest in making fishing poles is said to have come about during a time spent in his tackle shop.  Lew was retrieving a bamboo pole for a customer.  He was disappointed with the inconsistency from one pole to the next. This discrepancy led to a moment of reflection.  A moment that triggered his insatiable desire to build better fishing products than anyone else.

Lew, Bebe, Craig and Casey were beginning to realize their lifelong dreams were coming true when a nightmare hit. Lew, a pilot with his own sea plane and countless hours accumulated from flying to favorite fishing spots across the south, was killed in a crash on July 26, 1977. His two passengers survived; his son Casey and Lew’s grandson; Casey’s son.  Fortunately, by 1977, Lew’s commitment to quality was deeply embedded in every member of his company. Bebe, Craig and Casey forged forward with the same faith and knowledge that Lew had instilled in them for product development from design to final marketing.

40 Years of Innovation:

Over the 40-year-period, ranging from 1949 to 1989, the family-run business made many major contributions that would change forever the face of recreational sport fishing.  It was in 1989 that the Childre family licensed their name to Browning.  Beyond the speed stick and speed spool, additional introductions they were involved in included single-foot guide frames, aluminum oxide guides, unique spinning rod handles, Speed Sticker® worm hooks, Magic Carpet trolling motor, non-roller straddle-mounted trolling guides, Fuji FPS reel seat, V-shaped casting spool, SIC (silicon carbide) guide rings, Speed Spin® spinning reels, Speed Lock® reel seat/foregrip, telescopic graphite Speed Sticks, Fuji “V” frame guides, luminous tip downrigger rod, Hardloy guide rings, graphite Tennessee spinning handle, fused solid tip graphite rods, Boron Speed Sticks, graphite Bream Buster, Zirconia pawls, small body/large spool spinning reels, “Power Up” drag system and “Soft Trigger” handle system

Today, the Lew’s brand and its many well-known trademarks are under the ownership of Peak Rock Capital and longtime Childre family friend Lynn Reeves. Reeves has made the promise and commitment to return the Lew’s name to its place of prominence in the industry, keying on the same principles by which Lew Childre originally founded the company … building innovative products that are lighter, faster and stronger.

 

How to Properly Texas Rig

The Texas rig is arguably the most popular soft plastic rig used today. It can be used in freshwater as well as saltwater applications with many different kinds of soft plastics. I researched the inventor of the Texas Rig and finding a consensus is difficult. About the only thing we know for sure is that it was invented in Texas. Some say it was a guide down there that came up with the idea although his name was not saved for posterity. It’s too bad because that person would have definitely gone down in history as a fishing legend.

Being weedless, the Texas rig allows you to fish a soft plastic bait in and around weeds, brush and other types of cover while being able to stay virtually free of getting hung up. While it was first used primarily with worms it is now used with countless soft plastic baits in many different applications. You can fish a worm slowly along the bottom. You can pitch and flip a creature bait around cover, or burn a soft swimbait like a Gambler EZ through the Kissimmee grass in lakes in Florida. In saltwater, you can use the Texas Rig to fish a fluke or artificial shrimp. It is truly one of the most versatile rigs you can throw and even though it is decades old, there are still many anglers that don’t know how to rig it correctly.  In this video, we show you how to properly Texas rig a worm but remember that you can use this same rig with different baits. Give it a try the next time you are hitting the lake or skinny waters of the Gulf of Mexico and let us know how it fares for you. If you’re interested in purchasing the Trapper Tackle hooks mentioned in this video, click here.

By: Founder of Freshwaternation.com and Live to Fish Team Member: Dan Doyle

New 2017 Shimano Curado K from Live to Fish

It’s great when a fishing tackle manufacturer makes a product and completely gets it right. Unfortunately, a perfect relationship combining engineering, design, performance, and what emerges as the final product, doesn’t happen as often as consumers would like.  Fortunately, Shimano did, “get it right,” so to speak, with the Curado baitcasting reel.  The Curado has gained faithful fans and diehard enthusiasts. Given the legacy inherent within the Curado model line, there are fishermen who have literally been fishing with different versions of the Shimano Curado for decades.  Some brief history on the different versions of the Shimano Curado is noted below:

1992 Curado 100,200 (5:1) 2 bearings
1993 Curado 100A, 200A (6:1) 5 bearings
1994 Curado 200B (6.2:1) 5 bearings
1999 Curado 200B5 (5:1) 5 bearings
2001 Curado 200BSF (6.2:1), Curado 100B (6.2:1), Curado 200B38 (3.8:1) 5 bearings
2006 Curado 200DHSV (7:1), 200DPV (5:1) 6 bearings, 100D/DSV (6.2:1) 5 bearings
2007 Curado 300D (6.2:1) 6 bearings
2008 Curado 200E7 (7:1) 200E5 (5:1), 300E (6.2:1) 7 bearings

Before we get into the 2017 Curado K, some history concerning the Shimano company may be of interest.  If not, simply scroll down.

SHIMANO COMPANY HISTORY:

Most people are familiar with the Shimano name when it comes to fishing reels.  However, the company’s history may not be as well known.  In February 1921, Shozaburo Shimano opened Shimano Iron Works in Higashi Minato in Sakai City.  He was 26 at the time.  The location for his new company was a then demolished celluloid factory.  The monthly rent was 5 yen.  In 1921, that is the equivalent of $553.66.  The space measured no more than 430 square feet.  Shozaburo didn’t even own his own lathe.  Through a friendship with the owner of Sano Iron works, he borrowed the only lathe Shimano had at the time.  For the next 49 years, Shimano focused their manufacturing efforts on bicycle parts.  Shimano didn’t launch it’s Fishing Tackle Division until 1970.

Shozaburo Shimano:

Shozaburo Shimano 2

In 1978, the Bantam 100 and 100ex were the first reels produced under the Shimano name.  These reels were produced for the Lew Childre, Co.; more commonly known today as Lew’s. In 1989, the Childre family licensed the Lew’s brand to Browning.  Today, the Lew’s brand and its many well-known trademarks are under the ownership of Do Outdoors Inc., and longtime Childre family friend Lynn Reeves.  Here at Live to Fish, we proudly carry a number of Lew’s fishing reels, including the Lew’s TLCP1XH Team Lew’s Custom Pro.

In 1979, Shimano expanded their lineup with reels such as the 200, 300, 400, 500, and 10ex.  Most of these models continued until the early 1980’s.  Shimano needed a new price point in their lineup of reels, so they re-branded the old Curado into the Chronarch and cut the cost of the Curado.  The Shimano Curado became the middle man between the Chronarch and Citica.

THE NEW 2017 SHIMANO CURADO K

Curado K

The newest generation of Shimano’s Curado has a completely different shape from previous models.   I’ve personally owned and fished the previous Curado model in the way of a Shimano Curado 300E.  I bought the 300E after I’d purchased a Daiwa Lexa 300.  The Lexa 300 failed on me within the first month of ownership.  Daiwa appears to have fixed earlier problems with their Lexa line of baitcasters, but their first versions were not nearly as well made as the Curado 300 series.  In the race to create a large capacity, low profile, baitcasting reel, Shimano did a good job with the 300E.  What it lacked in drag power with 15 lbs of maximum drag, the 300 size Curado made up for it in nearly every other specification.  I used it for fishing in saltwater for Redfish, Snook, and Trout.  The Curado 300E was well suited to the saltwater environment.

Despite having a more compact size than the 300 series, the Curado K is no exception in terms of durability and reliability.  Shimano manufactured the new Curado K with both bass and inshore saltwater anglers in mind.  The reel features improved spool access and six shielded anti – rust ball bearings to help thwart corrosion.  The Curado series from Shimano has been one of the most popular reels for bass and inshore anglers looking for a reel they can depend on; day in and day out.  A reel that delivers on performance and features without breaking the bank.  The K series keeps that tradition alive, and goes with a much stealthier looking matte black finish than the previous green colored Curado.   In comparing the new Curado K to the most recent model, the new 2017 Curado K makes long casts are more effortless.  Short pinpoint casts seem more controlled with this new reel.  The new 2017 Shimano Curado K   is available for purchase through our website or by visiting our showroom located at: Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, FL 34669 (844) 934-7446.

MAJOR DIFFERENCES IN THE NEW SHIMANO CURADO K

The Curado K series feature Shimano’s latest baitcast reel technological advancements. Such advancements include uniquely smooth, highly efficient, and decidedly durable MicroModule gearing.  A technology explained in further detail below.  The Curado K comes in gear rations up to 8.5:1.  There are a total of six new Curado 200K reels.  A 6.2:1, 7.4:1, and 8.5:1 gear retrieve ratios.  All models are available in both right and left hand retrieve. When compared with the previous generation, the Curado K styling is quite noticeably more compact. The first major upgrade over the previous  version is the smaller overall size.  Shimano managed to achieve manufacturing a more compact version without sacrificing any capacity. Manufacture of the Curado K starts with a solid aluminum frame to keep things pinned together; eliminating reel twist.  The handle side sideplate gets an upgraded Ci4 sideplate.  The Ci4 material is lighter, yet more rigid.  It’s a proprietary carbon composite material Shimano uses in a number of their reels. The non-handle sideplate is made from more traditional graphite material.  Under the non – handle sideplate, you’ll find access to Shimano’s new SVS Infinity centrifugal brake system.  This is the same system first introduced on the much more expensive Shimano Aldebaran reels.  The SVS Infinity centrifugal brake system offers both internally adjustable brakes, and a broader range of micro-adjustment capability with the external dial. The inclusion of this braking system on the new Curado K is one of the biggest upgrades over the previous model.   A wider range of adjustments allows anglers to more accurately dial in the amount of  cast control specific to the weight and type of lures being used.

The next major change and advantage found in the Curado K is it’s MicroModule gearing. MicroModule gearing is basically a system involving a larger main gear with a greater number of teeth, but that are each smaller in size than the teeth in the previous version.  The result is a system that feels smoother and provides greater efficiency in terms of transferring power to the retrieve.  By allowing more teeth to contact each other, the gear train becomes more efficient. Precise engagement between the teeth means a smoother power transmission without reducing the strength of the reel.  The engagement occurs between the drive and pinion gears; giving you a more connected feel. MicroModule gearing is one of Shimano’s newest gear technologies.

SVS Infinity is a centrifugal braking system, with brake weights that use inner friction against the raceway during the cast to control spool speed. Put simply, the SVS Infinity system provides easy-to-manage, consistent spool control and brake force. The latest generation of SVS Infinity allows for a wider adjustment with the brakes. The new design reduces vibration and maintenance. The result is a smoother and longer cast.

Shimano uses their simple yet effective drag system in the Curado K.  The drag system consists of Carbon Drag washers on both sides of the internal brass gearing.  Shimano rates the Curado K with 11 lbs of drag.  However, some users have conducted controlled drag tests wherein 12 lbs were achieved.

Reduced frame size to allow for a more comfortable feel in the hand. The 10% reduction in both length and width make the reel easier to palm and reduces fatigue.  Demand for lighter, smaller, yet more capable tackle would be the underlying impetus for Shimano’s decision to reduce the size of the Curado.  You’ll find that the the B side (palm side) plate is now attached to the reel.  No more swinging open like previous versions.  That is more of an advantage than some may realize.  I’ve personally accidentally opened the previous Curado model to watch my spool fall out and sink.  Fortunately, I was in no more than 4 feet of water at the time.

FINAL SPECIFICATIONS:

6.2:1/26 Inches Per Crank
7.4:1/ 30 Inches Per Crank
8.5:1/ 36 Inches Per Crank

11 pounds max drag

90mm Handle Length

6+1 bearings (4 S-ARB, 2 SUS and Roller bearing)

Aluminum frame, CI4+ A-side, Graphite B-side

7.6 ounces (standard and HG)
7.8 ounces (XG)

Visit us in person at our address above, or online at www.livetofish.com to order a new Curado K today.  We have knowledgeable staff on hand to answer on your fishing gear and technique related questions, regardless of whether you’re fishing in freshwater or saltwater.

2017 Shimano Sustain FI – ICAST Best Saltwater Reel

ICAST stands for the International Convention of Allied Sportfishing Trades.  It is the world’s largest sportfishing trade show.  ICAST has the reputation as the premier showcase for the latest innovations in fishing gear, boating accessories, and apparel. ICAST is the bedrock of the sportfishing industry.  A successful showing at ICAST is known to result in a successful sales for that manufacturer for the foreseeable future.  Achieving a successful showing at ICAST would certainly be met if your product won a “Best Of,” ICAST show category.  In the category of  “Best New Saltwater Reel” the Shimano Sustain FI.  The Sustain is not a new model from Shimano.  It’s been in production for quite some time.  It’s first major overhaul took place 7 years ago.  In terms of quality and performance, the Shimano Sustain finds itself above the Shimano Stradic but below Shimano’s Stella line.

sustain

The first detail to take notice of is the designation of FI with the 2017 Shimano Sustain.  It’s predecessor was given the FG designation.  The main differences between the new Sustain FI and the former Sustain FG, are the addition of Shimano’s Hagane gear technology.   In addition, the Sustain FI has the G-Free body, X-Protect, Cross Carbon Washers, and the MGL Rotor.

Hagane Body design – The Hagane® body on the Sustain FI results in a rigid reel body.  The more rigid the body of the spinning reel, the less flex that occurs.  Reduced flex in the reel’s body means improved performance overall and less wear on the gears from being driven off center.

 

G-Free Body – The center of the mass of the reel has been moved closer to the rod to improve the reel’s weight and balance.  When you look at the reel, this design change appears as a small hump, or rise in the shape of the body, just beneath the spool.   This design was first utilized in the more expensive Shimano Stella but has now found it’s way into the Shimano Stradic and the Stradic Ci4+.  In the photo below and to the left, you can see the sleight hump referred to above present in the Stradic Ci4+.  Another reel available for sale at Live to Fish.

Ultra-hard Hagane cold forged drive gear – The Hagane precision cold forged gears provide one of the smoothest retrieve experience you will ever have, especially under a load.  The cold forging process uses nearly 200 tons of pressure to instantly create a precision gear without the need to do any cutting.  The advantage of this is that there is less room for error in the manufacturing process.  This proprietary process creates a gear drive system that is both durable and smooth.

Hagane 2

Magnumlite Rotor – Magnumlite is a new material that is even lighter than Ci4 and Ci4+ by as much as 30%.  Shimano uses the Magnumlite material to manufacture the rotor reducing more weight in the overall reel while still providing strength where it is needed.

X-Ship pinion gear – X-Ship is a combination of features that work together to enhance efficiency. By positioning the pinion gear closer to the centerline of the drive gear, more power is transferred from the handle directly to the rotor.  The increased power tranfer is beneficial when fighting fish and when working deep crank baits. The pinion gear is also supported by two Shimano SA-RB roller bearings. Support for the pinion gear in this manner provides more stability, reduces pinion gear twist, and rotor deflection; any or all of which can occur in extreme situations.  Engineering designed to eliminate such deficiencies provides a reel that will continue to feel smooth regardless of the circumstances and regardless of the pressure on the reel from a running fish.

X-Protect water resistance –  Common knowledge for those fishing in and around saltwater is the corrosive effect saltwater has on fishing gear.   X-Protect by Shimano uses a three lipped rubber seal that Shimano describes as a, “Labyrinth design.” Their intent is to make it nearly impossible for water to enter the rel through penetrating this seal.

Cross Carbon Drag system – The cross carbon drag system is fully and easily adjustable.  You have the option to dial in the exact amount of drag needed.  You can reduce the drag to near free spool, up to the reel’s maximum drag capacity.   The Sustain FI 2500/3000 have 20 lbs of drag and the Sustain 4000/5000 have 24 lbs of drag; decent numbers for an inshore reel.

8 S A-RB shielded stainless steel ball bearings –  The 8 ball bearings used on the Sustain are in the same family as the normal ARB bearings.  The exception is that with the additional shielding, the likelihood of any salt, dirt, or water, penetrating and affecting the bearings smoothness is greatly reduced.

Super Stopper II anti-reverse roller bearing – Shimano uses a one-way roller bearing.  Shimano gave this one way roller bearing the term, “Super Stopper II.”  A reel with Super Stopper II allows you to stop reeling and instantly set the hook, with zero back play coming from the reel.

The Shimano Sustain FI is available in 4 sizes. Model 2500, a 3000 that has the same size body as the 2500 but has a deeper cut spool for more line capacity both with 20 lbs of drag capacity.  Then the models 4000 and a 5000 .  The 5000 with a deeper cut spool for additional line capacity; both with 24 lbs of drag capacity.

While the Sustain is a great all around reel that can be used for all of your freshwater fishing, it is especially good for your inshore saltwater fishing.  The Sustain FI is also at home tackling certain smaller offshore species such as dolphin, smaller tuna, bluefish, and stripers.  If you are looking to target larger species such as tarpon, cobia, and bigger billfish, I would recommend that you look at something like the Shimano Saragosa or the Penn Slammer III.

 

Both of these reels are available at Live to Fish, www.livetofish.com, 844-934-7446 or visiting our showroom; Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, FL 34669.

The additional engineering focused on keeping saltwater out of the reel will benefit any angler.  Moreover, it lends itself to increased longevity with the reel.   All of the enhancements and improvements mean that you will have a reel capable of lasting longer and requiring less maintenance.  Regardless, rinsing your rod and reel with freshwater after every use should never be avoided.

 

 

Recover & Recycle Monofilament with Live toFish

Live to Fish has teamed up with the Florida Wildlife Commission to recover and recycle monofilament fishing line. Monofilament line can last hundreds of years before breaking down. Improperly discarded monofilament line causes devastating problems for marine life and the environment in general. Marine mammals, sea turtles, fish, and birds can become injured from entanglements, and some marine life go as far as to ingest the line, often dying as a result. Human divers and swimmers are also at risk.

The Monofilament Recovery & Recycling Program (MRRP) is a statewide effort that encourages monofilament recycling through a network of drop-off locations. This network of drop off locations is an efficient way to move large volumes of unwanted monofilament line, it’s free and available to the public at multiple locations including Live to Fish’s retail store in Hudson, Florida.

Please take the extra time to discard your monofilament line, it’s easy and it can make a huge difference in preserving our marine environments for generations to come. Live to Fish will gladly accept your unwanted fishing line and ensure that it gets disposed of properly. In the event that you are unable to find a drop-off location near you, feel free to mail your unwanted fishing line to us. Our store location, hours of operation, and mailing address are listed here.

Fuel Saving Tips When Using Your Boat

No one wants a trip out on the water to be something that results in a significant dent in your wallet.  Although some electric battery powered outboard options exist, they’re far from popular.  Nearly everyone’s outboard engine runs on gasoline with some boaters using diesel engines.  Unless your engine is one of the very few that runs on a battery, using your boat inevitably involves purchasing fuel.  “How much fuel will it burn?” is one of the most frequently asked questions by boaters looking to purchase a new outboard, or a new boat and outboard engine combination together.  The answer to that question is not as simple as providing an answer for fuel consumption in a car.  You may not realize that the amount of fuel your boat consumes is largely determined by factors you have control over.  The manner in which you run your boat; either all out, wide open throttle (WOT), or at a lesser speed, allowing for a more efficient correlation between RPMs and fuel consumption, will make a difference.  The way you load your boat and how much weight you add to your boat are additional major factors.  More than a half-dozen user controlled contributing factors need to be considered when calculating your boat’s fuel consumption.  Most people can easily figure out their car’s fuel consumption by dividing the distance traveled by the number of gallons used.  Calculating the fuel efficient of your boat involves different factors and a different formula.  Ultimately, fuel economy is improved by a combination of tactics that incrementally result in your boat using less fuel.  Below, we’ve listed a few tips to help you save fuel when out on the water.

Heading offshore 1

Choose the Right Prop

Selecting the right boat propeller is an important factor in maximizing your boat’s performance. Determining the correct size and style of boat prop will keep the engine operating within its recommended rpm range and allow it to apply its maximum horsepower to the water.  You need to be sure you’re selecting the right size propeller.  The size of a boat propeller is determined by referring to both diameter and pitch.  Diameter is twice the distance from the center hub of the propeller to the tip of any blade.  Generally smaller diameter props correspond with smaller, lower horse power engines.  Correspondingly, larger diameter props correspond with larger boats. Pitch is the forward movement of a boat propeller through one complete revolution measured in inches. Lowering prop pitch will increase acceleration and pulling power. A higher pitch prop will make a boat go faster; provided the outboard engine has enough power to keep the rpms in the optimum range. If your boat’s outboard engine doesn’t produce enough power to run a higher pitch prop, your overall performance will suffer.  Moreover, you can cause expensive and sometimes irrevocable engine damage.  Many factors come into play when selecting a propeller.  So numerous are the factors that propeller selection alone is the proper subject of an entirely different article.  There are differences in propellers such a rake, skew, and cup.  Ultimately, the message we here at Live to Fish want to convey is that there is a significant degree of importance associated with choosing the right propeller.  The correct propeller helps ensure maximum engine life and minimize wasted fuel consumption.

Optimum Trim

Utilizing trim tabs and properly using the tilt and trim on your outboard engine, will allow you to reduce the drag created by your boat’s hull as it moves through the water.  Reducing drag allows you to save fuel.  You will never be able to optimize your boat’s fuel efficiency if you don’t optimize your boat’s trim.  A properly trimmed boat has only the minimal amount of hull running through the water.  How do you know if you’ve got the minimum amount of your hull in the water?  Keep trimming out until your propeller begins to cavitate.  Cavitation occurs when the formation of air vapor is drawn into the water your boat is running through by the propeller.  You’ll know it’s occurring when the sound of your engine running changes dramatically.

Hard tops, T-Tops, and Towers

Opening or closing windshields, and raising or lowering canvas enclosures can help improve fuel efficiency.  Canvas enclosed T-tops, hardtops, towers and Bimini tops all create aerodynamic drag, causing the engine to work harder to make the boat go at any given speed.  On certain boats,  having canvas enclosures up can lower a boat’s top end speed by as much as 3 to 5 mph.  It’s important to note that not all T-Tops are the same.  There are some T-Tops that actually increase fuel efficiency by acting as a wing and creating lift.  A t-top’s ability to create lift is highly debated.  Boat manufacturers and t-top manufacturers will swear that their design creates lift and reduces drag.  Lift is produced when the air traveling over the top of a surface produces less pressure than the air traveling beneath the surface.  The problem with claims concerning a t-top’s ability to create lift is that water is close to 1,000 times more dense than air.  Because water is involved in determining lift given the substance your boat’s hull is running in, actual lift would normally not be something your boat would be capable of experiencing; regardless of the design of your t-top.  Another problem with these claims is the speed that air planes travel at versus the speeds most boaters travel at.  Lift could be a factor when the boat is traveling at 70 to 80 mph.  How often you travel at such speeds would be specific to you and your boat design.  The best course of action is to use your boat with any enclosures open to allow for the passage of air.  You can experiment by next closing certain enclosures and determining how much an impact on your fuel efficiency closing that enclosure has.

Back Off, Burn Less

Unless you’re competing in a fishing tournament, trying to make it over an area known to be shallow before the tide drops too much, or simply pushing the throttle to it’s limits in an effort to satisfy that need for speed that lives in most of us, slow down.  You’ll experience significant fuel savings without costing you any real time.

Put Your Boat on a Strict Diet

One of the quickest ways to get more miles per gallon is to reduce the weight you’re carrying.  What’s true for your car is true for your boat.  Most boaters are guilty of carrying too much gear.  A majority of the accumulation of the extra gear occurs slowly throughout the time you own your boat.  One tackle box, one water ski, and perhaps one additional gadget at a time. One of the quickest ways to get more miles per gallon is to remove items you don’t need.  We’re not suggesting that you remove tools, spare parts, or other safety items.  However, you don’t need all the fishing gear if you’re not going to be fishing.  You don’t need water skis or a wake board stowed below if you’re not going to be doing any of either.  If you store twelve packs or more of other types of drinks, just in case, removing those cases before you leave the dock will result in you saving more fuel.

Clean, Smooth, Hull

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Karl Sandstrom, a 21-year veteran with Evinrude, explained, “a clean, smooth bottom is a real efficiency enhancer.” If you keep your boat at a slip or mooring, use a quality bottom paint.  Traditional hard bottom paints are effective at reducing fouling on your hull, but hard bottom paints create a cratered surface after a few years of built-up coats. If you notice such craters on the bottom of your boat, use a scraper, hire a diver to clean the bottom, or have your bottom cleaned with a bead blaster to remove old cratered paint.  Joel Macri, captain of the Pershing Motor Yacht Milagros explained, “we have our bottom cleaned once every month with a diver.”  Once a month may sound extreme, but so is the vessel Captain Macri is piloting.   The Milagros boats twin MTU diesel’s turning out 2,638 HP each, for a total of 5,275 HP, turning twin propellers that are 4.5″ feet each in diameter.Photo of the Pershing Propellers

Maximizing efficiency as to your boat’s hull can be achieved through selecting what are called ablative paints.  Ablative paints are also known as self – polishing bottom paints.  It is a softer paint and allows the coating to wear off at a controlled rate.  A good comparison would be to imagine a bar of soap.  The wearing away of the self-polishing bottom paint allows for new, un-oxidized paint to be exposed. If you normally keep your boat on a trailer, or it comes in and out of the water for any reason, the paint will oxidize within 72 hours. Once placed back in service, the oxidized ablative paint wears away and exposes a new fresh outer coating with active protection. Ablative bottom paint is engineered with more recent and advanced technology than the traditional hard bottom, bottom paints.  It is the preferred bottom paint of most users since it typically lasts longer and continuously exposes a new active outer coating that protects against marine growth.

Calculate Your Boat’s Fuel Consumption:

A formula you’re probably familiar with for calculating how much gas your car uses is one in which you divide the total miles traveled by the total gallons of fuel used.  Once you have the total number of miles, you divide that by gallons to get what is called your average fuel consumption.  For boating, there is a different formula for calculating how much fuel you’re burning.  A different formula is necessary because the conditions a boat must encounter and travel over are different than what a car’s engine has to deal with.  Sea conditions vary more widely than road conditions.  The time it takes to cover a distance with a boat as opposed to car varies more often due to the significance of other factors not found on the road.  As a result, your boat’s fuel consumption is measured in gallons per hour (GPH). You measure fuel efficiency in pounds of fuel used per horsepower developed per hour. Boating lingo associated with fuel consumption will sometimes refer to the fuel consumption calculation as the, “brake – specific fuel consumption.”  In calculating fuel consumption for your boat, it’s important to know that gasoline weighs about 6.1 pounds per gallon and diesel fuel weighs about 7.2 pounds per gallon.  Generally, gasoline engines burn about 0.5 pounds of fuel per hour per horsepower unit.  On average, an in-tune four-stroke gasoline engine will burn about 0.50 pounds of fuel per hour for each unit of horsepower.  A well-maintained diesel engine burns about 0.40 pounds of diesel fuel per hour for each unit of horsepower it produces. These figures don’t take drag of the boat, sea conditions, or efficiency losses through transmissions and bearings into account. However, these figures do provide an excellent relative difference between engines.

Formula To Estimate Maximum Engine Fuel Consumption

GPH = (specific fuel consumption x HP) divided by Fuel Specific Weight

Constants in the formula are the Weight of a Gallon of Gas vs. a Gallon of Diesel

Specific Fuel Consumption:

Gasoline Engine: .50 lb. per HP.

Diesel Engine .40 lb. per HP

Fuel Specific Weight:  Gasoline: 6.1 lb. per gal. Diesel: 7.2 lb per gal.

300-hp Diesel Engine Example:  GPH = (0.4 x 300)/ 7.2 = 120/7.2 = 16.6 GPH

300-hp Gasoline Engine Example: GPH = (0.50 x 300)/ 6.1 = 150/6.1 = 24.5 GPH

Keep in mind that these formulas apply when the engine is making peak horsepower, which usually is near wide-open throttle. Fuel consumption will be decreased at cruising speeds.

Another way is to take the total engine horsepower and divide it by 10 for gas engines or .06 for diesel engines. That formula is simpler to calculate and easier to remember. You don’t even need a pencil and paper. However, it’s not going to be as accurate as the formulas above. The result represents the approximate gallons per hour the engine will burn at wide-open throttle. For example, a 150-horse engine will use about 15 gallons per hour. However, that figure is an average.  It can vary by as much as 10 to 20 percent.

There are marine electronics that can help in determining your boat’s fuel efficiency available from our website, www.livetofish.com One that is used for measuring your boat’s fuel efficiency is the Lowrance Fuel Flow sensor.  If you don’t see something you’d like or need on our website, feel free to contact us at 1-844-934-7446, email at: contactus@livetofish.com or visit our showroom: Live to Fish, 9942 State Road 52, Hudson, FL 34669Building Front