Fishing First Aid

Here at Live to Fish, we know that it’s always a good idea to be prepared with a first aid kit and other items that could potentially save you from disasters. In this entry, we’ll be discussing a couple of tips and tricks to help you become better prepared when you’re fishing on a boat.

Hook Removal from Skin

Got a hook stuck in your skin? No worries, just stay calm and prepare to remove it. First, you’ll want to clean the area, then decide which method you want to use to remove the hook. There are three common methods for removing fishing hooks from skin. Although every hook is different, these are the methods that have been reported to work best for people:

  1. Push the fish hook through and cut the barb off or crush it with plier cutters. Then gently slide it out.
  2. Grab it and pull it out as quickly as possible (this method may not always work and could potentially hurt more).
  3. Use fishing line to loop through the bend of the stuck hook. Push down on the opposite hook end with a partner and yank the string back (works best for small circle hooks). You can also do this more easily with the emergency hook remover tool by South bend.

Tips for Overcoming Nausea & Sea-Sickness

Motion Sickness is caused by mixed signals in the brain from your inner ears and eyes. Your inner ear has a lot to do with your sense of motion and balance, so being on/in anything that is moving may cause you to feel ill or nauseous. Many people suffer from motion sickness, it’s quite common for people traveling by car, train, plane, and boat. Although you could always take Dramamine and other drugs to help fight motion-sickness, there’s a bundle of ways that you can stop nausea on your own.

Many people don’t understand that much of sea-sickness is mental. The more you focus on your nausea, the more power you’re giving it to take over. Don’t do that! Stop. Breathe. And follow these helpful tips to take control. But just remember, if you get sick –don’t sweat it! Many people deal with sea-sickness on a regular basis. Sometimes it just happens and you have to let it run its course. Plus, in many cases you’ll feel a bit better after you toss your cookies. Here’s a few tips to help you fight sea-sickness:

  • Look up and out towards the horizon. This will help you be able to mentally focus on something that isn’t moving –which in many cases, the horizon may be the only point you can focus on that isn’t moving.
  • Change your direction. Try aiming your head in the same direction that your vessel is moving.
  • Chew gum. Sometimes this chewing motion can help keep away nausea.
  • Avoid alcohol. We know that drinking and fishing can go hand in hand, but if you’re prone to getting sea-sick, this may be something you’ll want to avoid.
  • Avoid harsh smells. Try to seek out fresh air to help you open your lungs and calm your gag reflexes. If you can, lightly spray aromatherapy smells in your surrounding area such as lavender and mint to help calm you down.
  • Pinch your wrist. Your wrists contain pressure points that help relieve nausea symptoms. If you find that this works great for you, pick up a Queaz-Away Wristband. This simple wristband contains a piece that gently pushes into your wrist’s pressure point when wearing it correctly. This option is also great because there’s no drugs involved.
  • Avoid concentrating on screens & reading. The more stress you put on your eyes to focus when you’re moving, the dizzier you’ll become.
  • Avoid direct sunlight and stay hydrated. The less hydrated you are, the more likely you’ll feel light-headed and more prone to nausea. If you’ve already gotten ill, get out of the sun and try to sip on water.
  • Sip on a soda. Many people report that sipping on some type of carbonated beverage helps settle their stomach. Everyone is different, so try for yourself and see if this works!
  • Stay towards the middle of the boat. By avoiding the ends of the boat (which have the most pronounced rocking motions) you’ll be able to keep better balance.
  • Be the captain. If you can, get behind the wheel and steer the boat. This will help keep your mind busy and your eyes on the horizon.
  • Keep your ears clean. If you don’t, the build-up of wax can make you more prone to sea-sickness. This is because your inner ears control your center of gravity.
  • Be rested. Make sure that you’re well-rested and get a good night’s sleep the night before you’re on the water. Good sleep helps your sense of balance and overall state of well-being.
  • Try using MotionEaze. This drug-free, doctor recommended motion sickness relief is safe for children and contains natural oils that fight dizziness & nausea. Simply place a drop behind each ear and feel relief within minutes.

Avoiding Bug Bites

Bug bites are at the top of the list of annoyances for many people trying to fish. Bug spray is a popular method to keep away bugs, but what if you have a skin allergy or just don’t like the idea of putting chemicals on your skin? Lucky for you, there’s a few alternatives to classic bug sprays. Now you can avoid itchy, annoying bug bites with an insect repellent wristband by Bugband or a Thermacell Mosquito Repellent Appliance. Bugbands repel mosquitoes, flies, & gnats, and they’re safe for children to wear. Each Bugband works for up to 120 hours. The Thermacell Mosquito Repellent Appliance repels mosquitoes, black flies, & other biting insects in a 15’ x 15’ area with the help of flame-less, odorless butane cartridges. This appliance is easy & safe to carry, and the best part is —it fits in your pocket! Any of the above methods will help keep you free of bites & bug-carrying diseases.

Emergency Water Filtration

In the case of an extreme emergency, it’s always good to have an emergency water filter. A single Emergency Water Filter by LifePack can make up to 3 liters of water a day for 3 days. Keeping a water filter handy on your boat is a great idea because you never know what could happen.

Once again, we at Live to Fish want to remind you to always be prepared when you’re heading out on a fishing trip —big or small. Some of these tools & tips might just come in handy someday!

Have questions about the information or products we discussed? We’re ready to answer any product questions that you may have. Just give us a call at 1-844-9FISHIN or drop us a line on our contact page.

 

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