5 Tips for Fishing with Kids & Newbies

Unfortunately, getting out on the water for a fishing trip happens less likely than most of us would want. A fishing trip involving a newcomer or young children can be even less likely. Having a newcomer to the sport of fishing, child or adult, is a valuable opportunity to pass on your passion for fishing. Additionally, it’s an ideal occasion to teach the less experienced fisherman about ethical fishing and boating practices. This article will help ensure trips with people not accustomed to fishing proceed as smoothly as possible. If you think back to where your passion for fishing first developed, you’re likely to recall going out with a fishing enthusiast. That ambassador to the sport of fishing likely contributed to your experience in ensuring it was favorable and unforgettable. Meaningful positive memories are ensured when helping someone with less experience end up with a fish on the line. The newcomer doesn’t necessarily have to be related to you, nor do they have to be a child. Witnessing the pure excitement exhibited by someone who hasn’t fought a fish before results in a rewarding experience for everyone involved. Follow the tips below to ensure that any fishing experience is one in which the chances of everyone enjoying the opportunity are increased.

  1. Don’t Focus on Targeting a Specific Species
    At first, the goal is simply to catch fish in general. This tip is especially true when fishing with children. When kids are along, remember that those under 10 years of age have a very short attention span. If they aren’t catching fish, boredom will soon follow.  If boredom sets in and isn’t relieved with a fish on the line, it will be all that much harder to convince them to go along with you in the future. For the first few trips, focus on going after whatever species is easiest to catch during that time of year. For the inexperienced fisherman, it’s not about the size of the fish, or the species. Gamefish or not, the newcomer will be happy that a fish goes from swimming freely to being caught. Go through the necessary preparations that you would normally follow before heading out. Such preparations include checking the tidal conditions for your area, among other things. If you don’t know what’s biting, ask a local bait shop employee or contact us.
  2. Don’t Try to Fish in Rough or Extreme Conditions
    Though you may cast concerns over wind and waves aside when heading out, someone new to the sport has not yet come to understand the fun and enjoyment that fishing brings. Your motivation to fish through uncomfortable conditions comes about as a result of the fond fishing memories you already have. Regardless of whether fishing from shore or from a boat, keep in mind that the experience is entirely new for your guest. They don’t yet share the same level of commitment and enthusiasm that you share for the sport. Exposing them to rough wind and waves may result in the person being skeptical to try the next time.  After a few successful trips, you can better gauge their endurance and willingness to deal with adverse conditions.
  3. Shorten the Duration of Your Trips
    Long trips require a similar type of endurance and enthusiasm as is required for fishing through adverse conditions.  Save the full day adventure for another time. Preferably after the novice shares your interest in the sport. How long should you plan the fishing trip duration?  Three to four hours is plenty of time to take someone out, put them on fish, and bring them back. Before you head out to catch whatever swims, make a note to pack plenty of snacks and drinks as well. You want to focus on maximizing comfort during the first trips. We sell a number of accessories to help make your trip as fun and enjoyable as possible.
  4. Cater Your Tackle to Beginners
    If you have children along, work to avoid use of treble hooks. Getting a hook in your hand or elsewhere has probably occurred to you at some point (no pun intended). Safe removal of the hook is difficult and even harder to do in a completely pain free manner. You want the hooks you remove with newcomers to be those stuck in the mouths of fish, not your guest. Fortunately, we offer a wide variety of single barb hooks.  You can easily exchange treble hooks with single barb hooks  without fear of losing the opportunity to hook up. Also remember that some manufacturers also make their lures with single barb hooks, so these types of lures are a good addition to any tackle box. Since we’re on the topic of lures, here’s another important point to consider – unless you’re simply trolling, lures require specialized knowledge involving how to work the rod and the rate at which to reel in. Each artificial bait is fished differently in order to attract strikes. When fishing with someone new to the sport, their concerns are likely to exist on a much lower level on the totem pole of fishing expertise. More likely than not, they’ll just want to make sure they nail learning how to cast. In this case, use of lures is not advisable and you should try live bait instead.
  5. Focus on Your Guests
    If you’ve ever hired a guide to take you out for a day of fishing, recall how much attention that guide provided to you. No, you don’t have to suddenly become as attentive as a professional fishing guide. The idea behind recommending that you keep your focus on your guests is to help them feel more comfortable doing something new. If you happen to hook one, hand the rod off and let them fight the fish. Valuable lessons are learned in how to properly handle a fighting fish, so it’s worth taking the time to pass on any knowledge you might have. Allow your guests the opportunity to take a close look before releasing the fish. An exception to giving you guests the chance to take a closer look would be if you happen to catch a large shark or saltwater catfish. In such instances, the risks likely outweigh the rewards. If you are going to release the fish, follow proper catch and release methods to ensure a safe release of the fish.

Be Patient & Encouraging
If they do something wrong or the fish shakes the hook, be sure to offer quick positive words of support and encouragement.  If you follow these tips, the chances of passing on your love of the sport increase.  Comment below or contact us if you have any other questions or for any further tips or suggestions.

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